Cavitation


Please take a quarter of an hour and watch this.

Time, apparently, is lag. To the extent that our minds have been programmed to admit that there is time. Because time is an illusion. But let’s compare electromagnetism with hydraulics.

Cavitation is a phenomenon in which rapid changes of pressure in a liquid lead to the formation of small vapor-filled cavities in places where the pressure is relatively low.

When subjected to higher pressure, these cavities, called “bubbles” or “voids”, collapse and can generate a shock wave that is strong very close to the bubble, but rapidly weakens as it propagates away from the bubble.

Cavitation is a significant cause of wear in some engineering contexts. Collapsing voids that implode near to a metal surface cause cyclic stress through repeated implosion. This results in surface fatigue of the metal causing a type of wear also called “cavitation”. The most common examples of this kind of wear are to pump impellers, and bends where a sudden change in the direction of liquid occurs. Cavitation is usually divided into two classes of behavior: inertial (or transient) cavitation and non-inertial cavitation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavitation

What if this liquid is the aether?
What if water is here to teach us about properties belonging to the aether?
What if the guy who swung this propeller will stop swinging?

Three questions only.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/66/Cavitating-prop.jpg

4 thoughts on “Cavitation

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